OC Political

A right-of-center blog covering local, statewide, and national politics

  • Custom Campaigns

    Custom Campaigns
  • DMI

  • Lindholm for County Board of Education

  • Pollitt for County Board of Education

  • Glasky for IUSD

  • Rackauckas for District Attorney

  • Woolery for Auditor-Controller

  • Iglesias for 69th Assembly District

  • Ming for Supervisor

  • Contact Us to Purchase an Ad

  • Lincoln Club of Orange County

Linda Lindholm for OC Board of Education Fundraiser: Tuesday April 22nd

Posted by Newsletter Reprint on April 18, 2014

This is the flyer for an upcoming fundraiser hosted by a bi-partisan coalition sent from the Lindholm for County Board of Education campaign:

14-04-22-Rooftop_Lounge_Inv

Posted in Orange County Board of Education | Leave a Comment »

Live from the 74th Assembly District Candidate Forum

Posted by Chris Nguyen on April 17, 2014

We’re live from the AD-74 candidate forum in the 2014 Feet to the Fire Forum series, sponsored by the Orange County Register, the Daily Pilot, and the Voice of OC.

Emceed by Barbara Venezia of the Orange County Register and John Canalis of the Daily Pilot, the media panel consists of Jack Wu of the Orange County Register, Alicia Lopez of the Daily Pilot, and Norberto Santana, Jr. of the Voice of OC.

All five candidates are here and are seated in this order: Keith Curry (R), Karina Onofre (D), Matthew Harper (R), Anila Ali (D), and Emanuel Patrascu (R).

7:07 PM: Venezia asks if the candidates think that they’re good politicians. Harper, Patrascu, and Ali raise their hands while Curry and Onofre do not. Venezia then asks Curry and Onofre why they didn’t think they were good politicians when they’re running for an office that, by definition, is a politician.

Curry says there need to be more businesspeople and problem-solvers, not political people searching for their next job.

Onofre says, “I agree with Keith Curry.” She says the third definition of politician in Webster’s is negative. She says the Legislature needs more businesspeople.

Ali says forums like this can give politicians a good name.

Venezia says money is necessary to tell voters what they stand for. She asks the candidates how much they’ve each raised for their campaigns, excluding personal loans.

Patrascu says he’s raised $100,000.

Ali says she’s raised $20,000-$25,000.

Harper says he’s raised less than $50,000. After being pushed by the media panel, he says $30,000-$50,000.

Onofre says $11,000.

Curry says $150,000, plus a $100,000 personal loan that he’ll spend.

Wu asks incredulously if Harper raised between $24,000-$44,000 in one month.

Harper says yes.

Wu asks what Harper’s cash on hand is.

Harper says issues matter, not money.

Wu asks Harper how will people know his stances on the issues if he can’t get his message out.

Harper points to forums like this as a way to get his message out.

Wu reiterates his point.

Curry says donations are an indicator of community support. He has 200+ donors. He says it’s difficult to believe Harper raised $24,000-$44,000 since Harper hasn’t reported any $1,000+ contributions since $1,000+ contributions require 24 hour reporting.

Santana asks what’s the point of sending another Republican to a Democrat-controlled Sacramento. He asks what can a Republican accomplish in the Legislature.

Curry says he can represent his district. He says 1974 and 1992 have demonstrated big party shifts can occur unexpectedly. He points to issues like taxes and education, where Republicans can win.

Wu reiterates Santana’s point.

Patrascu speaks of bringing a more diverse set of people, but people who oppose fee increases. He says that Curry has voted for 100+ fee increases.

Wu reiterates his point and Santana’s point.

Ali says she can get money from Sacramento because she is a Democrat and will have a seat at the table.

Harper says Republicans should not surrender and should build towards a majority.

There’s lots of cross-talk until Venezia shuts it down.

Onofre says she’s a Democrat female Latina conservative.

Ali jumps in to say she’s the sole Democrat to be endorsed by the state party.

Onofre says she can work across the aisle.

Ali says Onofre’s definitely proven that, pointing to Onofre’s party-switching.

Wu points out that Onofre sought the California Young Republican Federation endorsement days before she reregistered as a Democrat.

Onofre says Republicans don’t respect women and minorities.

Wu says he’s a minority Republican.

Onofre says she will stay a Democrat, with the laughter coming all her opponents, the reporters, and the audience.

Canalis asks what are Onofre’s conservative beliefs.

Onofre says she is a businesswoman and believes in the state spending within its means. She says she’s pro-choice.

Ali says Onofre said she was pro-life in a Tea Party flyer in this campaign.

Onofre says she represents the majority and that she is pro-choice.

Ali says she is endorsed by the Democratic Party.

Onofre calls Ali “girl” as she argues that the Democratic Party endorsed before Onofre became a Democrat.

Lopez asks if the candidates can work across the aisle.

Harper points to his work with his Council colleagues, who range from conservative Republicans to liberal Democrats.

Lopez asks about Harper’s Council record and if he believes there’s any role for government in environmental regulations.

Harper points to population growth, waste/recycling issues, and transportation. He says government should be curbed and smaller. He says government shouldn’t ban bonfires.

Santana asks about Harper’s jobs working for Supervisor Janet Nguyen and for OC Waste & Recycling in a position that did not exist until filled by Harper. He asks if this is ideologically inconsistent with smaller government.

Harper says the question is irrelevant and that it’s not a policy question.

Santana says it is relevant and that Harper grew government.

Harper says he left the County last year. He says OC Waste & Recycling is an enterprise fund. He says his duties at OC Waste & Recycling were necessary PIO (Public Information Officer) and PRA (Public Records Act) functions.

Venezia asks about Curry’s experience on the City Council, and specifically, the cost of Newport Beach City Hall.

Curry says he led the opposition to building Newport Beach City Hall in its new location, but the voters – knowing it would cost $100 million – voted to put it there. He points to a library expansion, a pedestrian walkway, and a dog park that were built as part of the City Hall project. He says the senior center was built in 3 years while Harper has a sign in a dirt field because Harper opposes construction bonds.

Patrascu says the City Hall project soared from $40 million to $230 million with the bonds. He compares it to buying a Louis Vuitton bag with a taxpayer-financed loan.

Curry asks what Patrascu would have cut from the City Hall project.

Patrascu says he would have cut the extra parking lot spaces.

Curry says that’s less than $200,000.

Patrascu says the spaces are rarely full.

Several in the audience shout the lot was full today.

Curry says he is a problem-solver, not an ideologue, pointing at Harper and Patrascu.

Ali says that it is important to build infrastructure for a global economy. She says she opposes tax increases and supports tax credits for small business. She says she will be more effective as a member of the majority party, the Democrats.

Harper points to Tom Daly, Sharon Quirk-Silva, and Jose Solorio as Assembly Democrats from Orange County. He says Solorio blew it on the budget.

Ali says there’s a surplus under a Democratic Governor.

Wu says the Governor raised taxes in Prop 30.

Venezia asks if Ali opposed Prop 30.

Ali says she would not vote for any tax increases.

Venezia says Onofre and Ali have never held public office, like City Council, to understand how politics work and asks if they’re qualified.

Ali says she has been on the front lines teaching students. She says she’s an Irvine City Commissioner. She says her grandmother was an Indian Assemblywoman.

Venezia asks Curry to weigh in.

Curry points to his record in Newport Beach. He says the best man in Patrascu’s wedding was a Democratic Assemblyman who’s helped fundraise for Patrascu. Curry says Republicans shouldn’t rely on Democrats for fundraising.

Canalis asks Ali about the Prop 30 tax increases again, in light of her being a public school teacher.

Ali says she supported Prop 30 and that taxes are now high enough to produce a budget surplus.

Harper says it is brave of Ali to oppose the split-roll for property taxes, which she did in prior forums. Harper says he, Patrascu, and Curry share Ali’s position on the split-roll. Harper says he doesn’t know Onofre’s position, as she has not appeared at prior forums.

Onofre says she has been busy with her tax preparation business up until April 15, so that’s why she missed prior forums.

Santana says OC gets $0.06 per $1.00 in property tax money from Sacramento. He asks how can other counties be persuaded to send more money to rich OC.

Ali says she would be in the majority party.

Santana asks for specifics.

Ali says Washington, DC needs to give more money to California.

Santana asks for specifics.

Ali talks about private-public partnerships.

Santana asks for specifics.

Curry points to post-Prop 13 education funding formulas drafted by Willie Brown. He says the formula benefits Santa Ana but harms Irvine. He proposes building coalitions to recraft the formula because post-1979 housing developments aren’t being accounted for.

Santana asks how this can be done.

Harper suggests a ballot measure.

Patrascu says that Republicans need to work across the aisle to get things done. He says he didn’t check his best friend from seventh grade’s party affiliation (referencing his best man alwho had been earlier attacked by Curry). He says again that people need friends across the aisle to get things done.

Santana asks about Patrascu’s statement opposing Larry Agran’s proposal for a friendship city with a city in Communist Vietnam due to its human rights violations. He says Assemblyman Travis Allen, Patrascu’s boss, went on a junket to Communist China. He asks Patrascu what is the difference between Vietnamese Communists and Chinese Communists.

Patrascu says the question needs to be asked of Allen and that Patrascu wouldn’t have gone on the trip.

Ali says she believes in people-to-people diplomacy, pointing to Obama’s efforts in Russia.

Wu asks about Ali or Onofre’s abilty to win. He asks about Democratic registration in AD-74.

Ali says Democratic registration is growing but declines to state a number.

Someone jumps in and says it’s 29%.

Wu asks how can a Democrat win or even make the November runoff when two female Democrats are running.

Ali talks about precinct walking and turning out the Democratic vote.

Wu asks how she can send mail with the $25,000 she’s raised, noting that he knows city council candidates who have raised more.

Ali says issues matter.

Onofre says she will use aggressive voter registration of Latinos to win.

Venezia asks if Onofre believes she will simply win the Latino vote solely because she’s a Latina.

Onofre says voters will vote for someone who looks like them.

Venezia says qualifications matter, not what people look like.

Onofre says she has run several businesses and has two Bachelor’s degrees. She criticizes the audience for laughing at her.

Harper says experience is important. He says voting records prove what a candidate stands for.

Lopez asks Patrascu about his experience with Travis Allen painting the public perception of Patrascu.

Patrascu says he’s running because he believes in smaller government. He says the 1994 Contract with America is a good example. He says Republicans cannot just say no, Republicans must stand for something. He says he hasn’t just worked for Allen, as he owns a consulting firm, worked for Senator Tom Harman, and has run several campaigns.

Canalis asks the Republicans for specific legislation they could get passed in the Democrat-controlled Legislature.

Harper says he could pass a bill protecting beach bonfire rings, which he says Curry would oppose.

Curry says his position on such a bill would depend on how it’s written. He says bonfires do pose a scientifically-proven health risk and that the decision should be made by City Councils, not the State or AQMD. He says state bureaucrats should not decide the fate of the bonfires and that it should be decided locally instead.

Patrascu says he just had his two-year-old son’s first bonfire. He points to having helped write Allen’s bill, which simply bans AQMD from banning bonfires. He says Curry believes gangbangers have bonfires, and Patrascu says he himself has held bonfires with his church.

Ali says her son enjoys bonfires. She wants a compromise between environmentalists and bonfire supporters, such as gas bonfires, like Newport Beach proposed.

Onofre says she agrees with Curry and Ali. She says Newport Beach has properly regulated bonfires.

Curry says his position has been misrepresented.

Patrascu says Curry is arguing semantics. He says Newport Beach supported AQMD’s decision.

Venezia asks if climate change is real or not: yes or no?

Patrascu equivocates.

Ali says yes.

Harper says yes, it does, but it’s not man-made.

Onofre says yes.

Curry says no.

Venezia asks if the candidates support medical marijuana: yes or no?

Patrascu says yes.

Ali says yes.

Harper says no.

Onofre says yes.

Curry says no.

The forum is over.

Wow, the Feet to the Fire Forum for AD-74 moved quick. This blogger kept up, but just barely. Most candidate forums are easy to liveblog, but this was a speedy challenge.

Posted in 74th Assembly District | Tagged: , , , , | 3 Comments »

Respected South County Leaders Bates, Walters, Harkey Endorse Linda Lindholm for Orange County Board of Education

Posted by Chris Emami on April 15, 2014

This came across the wire earlier today from the Linda Lindholm for Orange County Board of Education Campaign:

Lindholm

Respected South County Leaders Bates, Walters, Harkey Endorse Linda Lindholm for Orange County Board of Education

Contact: Chris Emami
chrisemami@custom-campaigns.com

ORANGE COUNTY, CA – Mayor Linda Lindholm, the leading candidate for the Orange County Board of Education’s Trustee Area 5 seat, has gained support for her campaign from South Orange County’s most respected women leaders. Orange County Supervisor Patricia C. Bates, Senator Mimi Walters, and Assemblywoman Diane Harkey have all officially endorsed Mayor Lindholm to represent South Orange County on the Orange County Board of Education.

“When I was in the Assembly, I carried bipartisan legislation to expand the number of entities that could authorize charter schools, and I know Linda Lindholm will help advance the ability of parents to start charter schools,” Orange County Supervisor Patricia C. Bates said. “We need Linda Lindholm and her pro-charter school leadership on the Orange County Board of Education.”

“As a State Senator, I’ve worked extensively on key education issues, and have successfully passed important digital textbook legislation into law. Linda Lindholm is an innovator who will use her experience to bring our children’s education into the twenty-first century, and that’s why I proudly endorse her,” said Mimi Walters. “Linda Lindholm is the best choice to represent South County’s children and families on the Orange County Board of Education.”

“With her experience teaching college students as a university instructor and leading a city as mayor, Linda Lindholm brings a unique background and set of skills that we need on the Orange County Board of Education,” Assemblywoman Diane Harkey said. “I am proud to endorse Linda Lindholm because we need her expertise leading the Orange County Board of Education.”

“As mayor, I have had the opportunity to work with Pat Bates, Mimi Walters, and Diane Harkey in improving public policy for South Orange County residents, and I am honored to have their support for Orange County Board of Education,” Lindholm said. “I am truly humbled by their support for my campaign to improve our education system.”

A businesswoman, Mayor Lindholm has served as the President of the Saddleback College Foundation Board, as President of the Beta Foster Care Advisory Board, and as the City Liaison on the Laguna Niguel Youth Committee. She has also served on the Capistrano Unified School District Instructional Materials Review Committee and the Prevent Child Abuse – Orange County Advisory Board.

Professionally, Lindholm has taught college students as a university instructor and worked with school districts on developing programs for teachers of children with physical and learning disabilities. She earned her Bachelor of Science Degree from Colorado State University and her Master’s Degree in Public Administration from the University of Kansas.   Lindholm and her husband, Wayne, have three children.

###

Paid for by Lindholm for Board of Education 2014. ID# 1363994

Posted in Orange County Board of Education | Tagged: , | 1 Comment »

Good Guys Win One In Court – Righeimer And Mensinger Defeat Union’s Bogus Legal Ploy

Posted by Greg Woodard on April 14, 2014

[Warning, boring legal stuff ahead, but it is important].  Many OC Political readers are familiar with the plight of Costa Mesa Councilmembers Jim Righeimer and Steve Mensinger as they have failed to back down to aggressive (and allegedly dirty) union tactics.  For those of you unfamiliar, Righeimer and Mensinger have filed a lawsuit against the police union, the union’s former law firm, and an investigator previously used by the law firm, alleging, among other things, that the defendants have engaged in spying, threats, intimidation, assault, and false reports of criminal activity.  Recently, they have alleged that the defendants illegally placed a GPS tracker on Mensinger’s car during the last election.

Apparently, the defendants have been stonewalling Righeimer and Mensinger, including the investigator repeatedly asserting his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination during his recent deposition as Righeimer and Mensinger are trying to get to the bottom of who is responsible for the tracking, and other purported illegal activities.

Enter the defendants’ lawyers for another round of delay.  They recently filed what is called an “anti-SLAPP” motion.  In a nutshell, an anti-SLAPP motion alleges that Righeimer and Mensinger have violated the defendants’ right of petition or free speech.  While enacted for good reasons, sadly many lawyers abuse the process because filing an anti-SLAPP motion automatically stays all discovery, preventing Righeimer and Mensinger from getting important facts and documents.  In addition, filing an anti-SLAPP motion early in the case forces the plaintiffs to factually defend their claims, even if the defendants are in possession of the facts and documents needed to proved the case, or risk having the lawsuit dismissed.

The defendants’ motion claimed that the principal thrust of the lawsuit is the 911 call that the investigator made against Righeimer, falsely accusing Righeimer of driving drunk.  The Court rejected that claim, denied the motion, and held that the main thrust of the action is the false and malicious reports of criminal activity by the investigator as an agent for the other defendants.

So what does this mean?  It means that for now, Righeimer and Mensinger can continue with their discovery and hopefully find out whether the law firm, the union, or both, were behind these dirty tactics.  It also means that the Court did not buy the defendants’ bogus claim that their alleged illegal activities are protected.  It also means that Righeimer and Mensinger are as committed as ever to exposing the union and its efforts to shut down any attempts to rein in its power.

Righeimer and Mensinger have had their personal lives put under a magnifying glass because of their efforts against unions.  They have been followed, falsely accused, illegally tracked, and had their families dragged into the fray.  Yet they refuse to be scared or threatened into giving up.  We should applaud these men and their families, support them, and look for other leaders like them in our communities to support and get elected to local, state, and federal positions.  Only then can we begin to make inroads into the unions’ enormous power over California.

Posted in Costa Mesa, Orange County | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

AD-55 Watch: Ling-Ling Chang Quacks out of SGV Tribune Editorial Board Meeting

Posted by Allen Wilson on April 14, 2014

The San Gabriel Valley Tribune Editorial Board had an Q & A session with the candidates running for State Assembly in the 55th Assembly District.

Assembly candidates Phillip Chen (R), Steve Tye (R) and Greg Fritchle (D) attended the meeting with the paper.

Unfortunately, Ling-Ling Chang was a no-show for a meeting with the Editorial Board.  Chang also skipped out of last Tuesday’s candidate forum at the Salt and Light Ministry at Calvary Chapel in Diamond Bar.

Is it possible that she snubbed the meeting with the San Gabriel Valley Tribune, because she did not earn the paper’s endorsement when she first ran for Diamond Bar City Council in 2009?

Though, Chang thought it was important to let the world know via Twitter that two mallard ducks came by her campaign headquarters last Saturday in Brea.

image

However, Chang should realize that quacking out of a meeting with the San Gabriel Valley Tribune is nothing to quack about.

If the voters in the 55th Assembly District can’t take Chang seriously as their next Assemblymember, then her candidacy is just all about quacks.

Posted in 55th Assembly District, Brea, California, La Habra, Placentia, State Assembly, Uncategorized, Yorba Linda | Tagged: , , , | 1 Comment »

Phillip Chen Not Truthful with O.C. Register

Posted by OC Insider on April 12, 2014

AD 55 Candidates Phillip Chen and Ling-Ling Chang

AD 55 Candidates Phillip Chen and Ling-Ling Chang

When Phil Chen was asked why he claimed his occupation was “Los Angeles County Deputy Sheriff” when he was really a county health care employee, Phil told the O.C. Register he served as a reserve for 20 hours a month.

Chen told the newspaper that he’s served “about 20 hours a month in the job since 2007” and “makes no apologies for the representation.”

Yet since 2010, Chen has averaged 2.1 hours a week – not the 20 hours/month he falsely claimed.

Los Angeles County records show that the only time Chen has been seen in uniform in 2014 is in his campaign literature. In fact, since 2010, there have been 30 individual months where he did not show up even once.

Phillip Chen chose to answer a question about him making a false claim about his occupation by making a false claim about what he did as a reserve.

Count on him to follow-up with another false claim about Ling-Ling Chang!

Posted in 55th Assembly District | Tagged: , | 2 Comments »

AD-55 Watch: Hugh Nguyen endorses Phillip Chen

Posted by Allen Wilson on April 10, 2014

We just received this press release from Phillip Chen for Assembly Campaign that popular Orange County Clerk-Recorder Hugh Nguyen endorses Chen for Assembly:

Orange County Clerk-Recorder Hugh Nguyen Endorses Chen for Assembly

ORANGE COUNTY, CA – Today Phillip Chen announced the endorsement of another high ranking Orange County Republican elected official. Phillip announced Orange County Clerk-Recorder Hugh Nguyen’s support in his campaign for State Assembly. Phillip continues to build on his momentum in the campaign for the 55th Assembly District.

Hugh Nguyen cited Chen’s commitment to reforming state tax and business policies as reason for support. “In the Assembly Phillip Chen will protect taxpayers, reform government, and work to cut through the red tape that holds back small businesses in our area. That’s why I’m supporting him.”

Nguyen joins a list of Orange County local leaders and elected officials that already includes Sheriff Sandra Hutchens, District Attorney Tony Rackauckas, Supervisor Shawn Nelson and Assemblymembers Diane Harkey and Travis Allen.

Phillip Chen is a Republican, small business owner, educator and reserve deputy sheriff. The 55th Assembly District is split between Orange, San Bernardino and Los Angeles Counties.

Posted in 55th Assembly District, Orange County, State Assembly | Tagged: , , , | 4 Comments »

Live from the 5th Supervisorial District Candidate Forum

Posted by Chris Nguyen on April 9, 2014

We’re live from the 5th Supervisorial District Candidate Forum, sponsored by CWLA, the Laguna Woods Village Satellite Republican Group, and the South Orange County PAC.

The three major candidates are here: Mayor/Businesswoman Lisa Bartlett (R), Orange County Businessman/Councilmember Robert Ming (R), and Councilmember/Businessman/Engineer Frank Ury (R). The minor candidate, Deputy District Attorney Joe Williams (NPP) is not here.

We await the start of the forum.

6:48 PM: Bartlett gives her opening statement. She was born in Culver City and came to OC at age three. She goes over her electoral history. She says Dana Point had no unfunded pension liability and no debt. She says the County has a $9 billion budget and 18,000 employees. (Editor’s Note: she uses this $9 billion figure three times, but the County budget is $5 billion. Also, there are 17,000 County employees.) She speaks about her education. She is an executive at her business. She says she serves on regional boards in leadership roles.

6:50 PM: Ming gives his opening statement. He speaks about his work as counsel at an investment banking firm. He speaks about his wife and four children. He speaks about his fiscal responsibility and protecting public safety, roads, and parks while improving how all of those services and social services are delivered. He speaks about his leadership helping form ACC-OC and leading the Military Support group.

6:52 PM: Ury gives his opening statement. He praises Pat Bates’s service. He speaks of serving in elected office for a decade. He gets the first laugh line of the night joking about being an engineer in politics. He speaks about his family. He speaks about economic development and job creation. He says Mission Viejo has a AAA bond rating. He says Mission Viejo is the second-least expensive CA city to do business and is the safest city. He notes that he serves on OCTA.

6:54 PM: First question is about the $150 million VLF money owed by the County to the State.

6:55 PM: Bartlett proposes centralizing IT at the County. She suggests looking at shared services for public safety and social services. She describes AB 109 prison realignment. She speaks about how public safety is the top priority of government.

6:57 PM: Ming says OC needs to fight for a fair share of taxpayer dollars from Sacramento. He speaks about property tax, triple flip, and ERAF shifts. He says he would fight for local government to determine property tax allocation. He proposes asking County employees to write down when they wonder “why do we do this this way?”

6:59 PM: Ury says the County needs to send people up to Sacramento and DC that they want to see up there, not people who have an acrimonious relationship. He speaks of shared services between agencies. He’d like to have a “Buy OC” program to provide services from OC vendors.

7:00 PM: Question on pension reform. County has already implemented 1.62% at 65 and requiring employees to pay their entire employee share.

7:01 PM: Ming proposes allowing employees to select from more investment options for retirement plans. He says working for efficiencies would ensure the number of members of the pension plan would be efficient. He speaks about leading ACC-OC’s pension reform plan.

7:02 PM: Ury says he implemented pension reform in Mission Viejo and at OCTA. He speaks about Mission Viejo’s Rose Award from OCTax. He speaks about the importance of viability of plans. He proposes leasing out County facilities for cell towers.

7:04 PM: Bartlett speaks about the Vallejo bankruptcy. She says Dana Point has made advance payments to eliminate their pension liability. She proposes balancing costs to employees and paying off the pension costs by controlling the employee pension contribution.

7:06 PM: Question on Caltrans, OCTA, 3+ HOV lanes, and toll lanes (e.g. the 405).

7:07 PM: Ury says South County is fine. He doesn’t want Caltrans to impose another toll lane. He believes the current number of toll lanes is fine. He says adding two free lanes to the 405 would have come at the expense of the El Toro Y.

7:08 PM: Bartlett speaks about developments like Rancho Mission Viejo. She speaks about the Tesoro extension on the 5. She says gridlock can be addressed locally or in Sacramento. She calls for open-mindedness, though she prefers not having 3+ HOV lanes.

7:09 PM: Ming says voters passed Measure M, and OCTA should give the voters what they voted for. He is a TCA board member and says people should get what they voted for.

7:11 PM: Question about the 241 toll road extension and widening the 5 via the Tesoro extension.

7:12 PM: Bartlett wants to complete the Tesoro extension and the 241 toll road extension. She says that people need alternative exit routes in case of evacuation.

7:13 PM: Ming supports the Tesoro extension. He says he supports the 241 toll road extension but with a different route and approach. He’d like a compromise for all stakeholders.

7:14 PM: Ury supports both extensions as well. Ury says it is a conflict of cutting down carbon emissions versus reducing congestion. He proposes locking everyone in a room. He says the air quality people are also the anti-extension people, and he says those are positions in conflict.

7:16 PM: Question asks what’s the difference between the candidates.

7:17 PM: Ming speaks about having spent his career bringing together conflicting parties to reach a compromise. He says he is a consensus builder. He mentions his ability to work with existing Supervisors and notes his endorsement by Supervisors’ Chairman Shawn Nelson. He says standing on principle helps people better understand where a Supervisor stands on issues.

7:18 PM: Ury says he is an engineer, which brings a different skillset. He says he is a problem solver. He speaks of leading a division of Intel. Ury says he is the only one who works with a $1 billion+ budget via OCTA.

7:19 PM: Bartlett says she is a woman. She speaks of her experience of efficiency, balance budgets, and leading staff. She says she brought her private sector experience to Dana Point and wishes to take that to Orange County.

7:20 PM: Question on affordable housing.

7:20 PM: Ury says the state needs to understand what it is imposing on local communities, particularly unfunded mandates. He says there needs to be jobs and homes for 20-33 year olds, who are leaving OC because it’s too expensive.

7:22 PM: Bartlett suggests public-private partnerships. She says more jobs allows more people to afford homes. She wants to put in developments with multiple price points.

7:24 PM: Ming says housing developments take a lot of time, effort, and work from the private sector. He says home builders need incentives like property rights protections in order to actually build homes. He says government doesn’t build homes.

7:26 PM: Questions about homelessness and a homeless shelter.

7:26 PM: Bartlett says homelessness is in every city. She speaks of government working with nonprofits to prevent homelessness. She says a bed, food, and shelter is not necessarily the answer. She says providing hospitalization and similar facilities is needed. She says the cities should address homelessness first before the County does.

7:28 PM: Ming says government does some things well and some things poorly. He says the same is true of the private sector. He says the private sector does an excellent job with homelessness, pointing to the OC Rescue Mission. Ming says government should facilitate nonprofits solving homelessness. He wants government to partner with nonprofits to teach people to fish rather than giving them fish.

7:30 PM: Ury speaks about his daughter’s work with disadvantaged teenage girls. He says there needs to be more dialogue with faith-based organizations. He says his church has a food kitchen and shopping carts. He believes faith-based groups have been left out of this for too long.

7:31 PM: Question about restoring confidence in government.

7:31 PM: Ming wants to expand accountability measures. He says government needs to spend money logically, and he says the County should better communicate what the County does and what it’s spending it on. He calls for strong leadership and accountability.

7:33 PM: Ury says put transparency in the light of God, pointing to the Latin root of confidence. He speaks about televising Mission Viejo’s Council meetings. He calls for better ways for people to search for documents. He wants to bring more public comment to meetings.

7:34 PM: Bartlett says better communication is needed. She says CalOptima and IT centralization are good things that need to be communicated to the public. She wants to tell people what County services are available to them. She says she wants to educate the public.

There are murmurs of opposition in the crowd.

7:37 PM: Question about Dana Point Harbor revitalization project funding.

7:37 PM: Ury says the project has $40 million of the $120 million needed. He says there needs to be a charge to fund the harbor in perpetuity.

7:38 PM: Bartlett notes she’s lived in Dana Point for 25 years. She says her first four years got downtown and harbor plans approved. She says this plan will revitalize Dana Point Harbor and make it the jewel of South County. She says she has experience working with the Coastal Commission. She suggests using a combination of General Fund, grants, private funds, and government bonds to raise the funds needed.

7:40 PM: Ming says the project’s first phase is fully funded. He says phase one should be completed before moving on to funding other phases. He says the results of the first phase need to be seen, so the private sector can see if it wants to help fund the later phases.

7:42 PM: Question about personal values, strengths, and weaknesses.

7:43 PM: Bartlett says her strength is building consensus and leading regional agencies. She says she has an open-door policy. She says people seek her advice. She says her weakness is that she’s a night owl.

7:43 PM: Ming says his faith, family, and freedom are his three top values. He lives his personal life by the moral standards of his faith. He is in government to help make the world a better place for his four children. He wants to protect people’s freedoms because that is what the U.S. is about. He says his strength is listening to people and discussing things with them. He says his weakness is doing too much.

7:45 PM: Ury speaks of being born in Long Beach and growing up in the Midwest. He speaks of his Calvinist minister grandfather and his Hungarian Revolution-fighter father. He says his strength is his financial background at both the school board and the city council. He says his weakness is doing too much.

7:47 PM: Question on what they admire about their opponents.

7:47 PM: Ming praises Ury and Bartlett’s work at ACC-OC, where all three have served in leadership. He says he considers them both friends and hopes the friendships last beyond the campaign.

7:48 PM: Ury notes that Ming was ACC-OC’s first president, Bartlett was the second, and Ury is the fourth. He says Ming is a hard-worker and does his due diligence. He says Bartlett is passionate about issues. He says the challenge is all three run well-governed cities, unlike Los Angeles.

7:49 PM: Bartlett says all three are dedicated public servants who have reached out beyond their city boundaries to serve on regional boards and commissions. She says all three work well with others.

7:50 PM: Ury gives his closing statement. He praises Pat Bates and says he hopes she sticks around. He speaks of priorities of job growth, economic development, and infrastructure. He says Laguna Woods’s senior mobility program had a funding problem that Ury helped solve at OCTA for the next five years before it even became an issue. He speaks of his endorsements from Sheriff Sandra Hutchens, District Attorney Tony Rackauckas, Congressman Gary Miller, OCTax, and OCBC.

7:53 PM: Bartlett says she gives 110%. She says Dana Point is on solid footing. She says she is on regional boards and commissions, including as Chair of F/ETCA and on SCAG’s Executive Board. She says she has endorsements from elected officials in the 5th District and outside the district, though she does not name them. She speaks of working on contracts with other agencies. She speaks of senior services being well-rated in Dana Point. She speaks of being able to work with people of all levels, from secretaries to executives. She says Supervisors must work with state legislators and members of Congress.

7:56 PM: The moderator has to cut off Bartlett for going over time.

7:56 PM: Ming urges people to look at voting records, and he is proud of every vote he’s cast. He says job growth requires government getting out of the way. He says overregulation must stop. He says Laguna Niguel does not have a AAA debt rating because it has no debt. He speaks of the Laguna Niguel City Hall being paid for in cash, not debt. He notes his endorsements by Supervisors’ Chairman Shawn Nelson, Senate Republican Leader Bob Huff, Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Associaton, and the Lincoln Club of Orange County. He says he is a bridge-builder who is a consensus-maker. He says he listens to his constituents.

7:58 PM: The moderator acknowledges the presence of outgoing Supervisor Pat Bates, and the forum ends two minutes early.

Posted in 5th Supervisorial District | Tagged: , , , | 7 Comments »

Atlas PAC Endorses Mayor Linda Lindholm for Orange County Board of Education

Posted by Newsletter Reprint on April 9, 2014

This just came across the wire from Atlas PAC:

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 
April 9, 2014
CONTACT: Lee Lowrey, Chairman, ATLAS PAC

Atlas PAC Endorses Mayor Linda Lindholm
for Orange County Board of Education

 

ORANGE COUNTY, CA – Atlas PAC has endorsed Mayor Linda Lindholm in her campaign to become South Orange County’s representative on the Orange County Board of Education. The group joins a growing list of education leaders, organizations, taxpayers, parents, and teachers supporting Lindholm for Orange County Board of Education, Trustee Area 5.

“An innovator and advocate of smaller government, Linda Lindholm has led her city to become a model of fiscal responsibility, with no unfunded pension liability, no debt, and a city hall constructed using cash reserves rather than creating debt or raising taxes,” said Atlas PAC Chairman Lee Lowrey. “I have had the privilege of observing Linda Lindholm’s career for many years, and I can’t think of a better person to represent South Orange County families on the Board of Education.”

“I am proud to stand with Atlas PAC in supporting the principles of limited government, fiscal responsibility, and opposition to unfunded government mandates,” Lindholm said. “I’ve taught college students, worked with school districts, and served on education committees, so I look forward to representing the residents of South Orange County on the Orange County Board of Education.”

A businesswoman, Mayor Lindholm has served as the President of the Saddleback College Foundation Board, as President of the Beta Foster Care Advisory Board, and as the City Liaison on the Laguna Niguel Youth Committee. She has also served on the Capistrano Unified School District Instructional Materials Review Committee and the Prevent Child Abuse – Orange County Advisory Board.

Professionally, Lindholm has taught college students as a university instructor and worked with school districts on developing programs for teachers of children with physical and learning disabilities. She earned her Bachelor of Science Degree from Colorado State University and her Master’s Degree in Public Administration from the University of Kansas.   Lindholm and her husband, Wayne, have three children.

###

Posted in Orange County Board of Education | Tagged: , | Leave a Comment »

RPLAC Endorsement Consideration: No on LA County Sheriff

Posted by Allen Wilson on April 8, 2014

Tanaka

On April 19, 2014, the Republican Party of Los Angeles County (RPLAC) will take up slate of endorsements for consideration in the local and county contests such as County Supervisor, Superior Court Judges and Los Angeles County Sheriff.

The contest for Sheriff is highly contested due to the departure of Lee Baca has attracted 7 candidates:  Detective Supervisor Lou Vince, Assistant Sheriff/Lakewood Councilman Todd Rogers,  Retired Sheriff Lt. Patrick Gomez, Retired Sheriff Commander Bob Olmsted, Long Beach Police Chief Jim McDonnell, Retired Undersheriff/Gardena Mayor Paul Tanaka, and Assistant Sheriff James Hellmold.

Tanaka is the lone Republican running for County Sheriff is seeking RPLAC’s endorsement.

Judi Neal, RPLAC Member from the 41st Assembly District (Claremont-Pasadena), made an appeal via e-mail to RPLAC Members to block such endorsement in light of recent scandals that has snared the LASD:

To the Members of RPLAC,

I am writing to each of you regarding the Republican candidate running for Sheriff of Los Angeles County.  Paul Tanaka is the only “registered” Republican running for Sheriff and it may be that he will automatically be endorsed by RPLAC on April 19th, however, given that he is part of a three year investigation by the FBI and that the DOJ is opening their own investigation into alleged allegations an endorsement at this time may not be in the best interest of the Republican Party.

Adhering to full disclosure, I must advise that my father, a retired Commander with the Sheriff’s Dept. questioned the integrity of both Lee Baca and Paul Tanaka.  He was very concerned with the path he saw the Dept. taking under their direction and control.  At a recent Meet & Greet Paul Tanaka was asked about his Viking tattoo.  He will tell you that it’s “just a mascot”, that would be an understatement.  Deputies out of numerous stations have a reputation of playing fast and loose with the enforcement of the law.   Getting the tattoo showed they were part of the Deputies inner circle.

Our by-laws prohibit us from endorsing anyone other than Republicans; however, they don’t say we have to endorse the wrong candidate just because they have an “R” after their name.  In the case of Paul Tanaka, I believe it would suit us to withhold any endorsement until the remainder of the indictments are announced.  In other words, the person we endorse should have no encumbrances or hint of scandal that would embarrass and weaken the party.  We do not need public fallout as we are trying so diligently to rebuild and restore the Republican franchise.  Therefore, I am asking that we invoke Item 12, from the RPLAC Endorsing Rules and Procedures and that as many members as we can get to stand with me at the meeting on April 19th and block this endorsement.

Item 12 states “All Republican candidates who have requested a party endorsement, and who are running in races where there is no other Republican candidate, will be automatically endorsed, except in the situation where two or more members request the County Party to withhold such automatic endorsement and hold a vote for that Candidate.  In such an instance, a vote to endorse will be held for that candidate, who must receive a 2/3 vote of the membership.”

Los Angeles Magazine has written the most accurate account of the actions leading up to the recent indictments and those yet to come.  There are four segments so please read them all. Also see The Citizen Commission of Jail Violence.  Please note this is my opinion and in no way reflects the opinions of anyone else associated with RPLAC. 

Respectfully Submitted,

Judi Neal

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

 
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 885 other followers

%d bloggers like this: